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Is Testing Jet Engines Dangerous ?

Many have asked over the years if testing jet engines is a dangerous thing to do. Let's look into that and try to come up with some sort of answer...

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  1. OldMech

    OldMech

    9 күн мурун

    Yes, engine runs can be dangerous. A very close friend got sucked into a jet B737 JT8D engine running at power. His body got stopped by the IGV (inlet guide vanes). The engine went into compressor stall and that kicked him back out. Fortunately he only lost a hand.

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      7 күн мурун

      Well, something's going on there. An experienced mechanic of jet engines just does not get close enough for such a disaster. Was it distraction, complacency (neither of which is likely around a JT8D at high power) or some other factor. Interesting story.

    • OldMech

      OldMech

      8 күн мурун

      @AgentJayZ I use to work on B747 JT9D engines while running at idle. I would take off the core cowling then put the engine in reverse. That diverts the fan air forward. Great. No bypass air. No wind. Great for checking for air, fuel, or oil leaks.

    • OldMech

      OldMech

      8 күн мурун

      @AgentJayZ My friend that got sucked into a jet engine was a mechanic. Running at high power is a routine maintenance procedure. He got just a bit too close to the inlet. Not much more of a story than that.

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      9 күн мурун

      Your friend was where he should not have been. There is more to your story.

  2. West Tex

    West Tex

    18 күн мурун

    One of my coworkers was telling of a time where an industrial turbine disc flew off during a mishap. I don’t remember if he was at the site during the incident or after the fact, but he said that the disc had sliced through the engine casing, then through the external engine enclosure, then through a few other building walls and ended up halfway across the power plant site.

    • OldMech

      OldMech

      9 күн мурун

      American Airline’s lost a disk on an high power maintenance run to check for vibrations. B767 LAX. The aircraft suffered a lot of fire damage.

    • West Tex

      West Tex

      16 күн мурун

      @AgentJayZ Perhaps. I haven't been on your channel in 5-6 yrs tbh, so maybe was an old video. But I am pretty sure it was from my coworker who has been a site manager working on gas turbine power plants for many decades, both on new builds and rebuilding sites after accidents. He had some crazy stories (people closing a high voltage circuit-breaker out-of-phase, etc).

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      18 күн мурун

      Yes, that was probably me that told you that.

  3. ajay choudhary

    ajay choudhary

    19 күн мурун

    love it so much cant believe its been 10 years since i began following this channel

  4. mikelagaffe

    mikelagaffe

    21 күн мурун

    man, id like to learn to do maintenance and rebuilds like that.. is there a school for this or somewhere to get a job in it and all?? my dream was to fly but i couldnt become a pilot for medical reasons... namely, extremely poor eyesight beyond a couple meters....

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      21 күн мурун

      Watch my video called So you want to work on jets...

  5. Alan Daters

    Alan Daters

    Ай мурун

    Hey! I just found the "Orenda" plaque which was missing from one of the engines outside. It is hanging on the wall above the pegboard, next to a couple of wrenches!

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      Ай мурун

      That one is from ser #2052. Sadly, she didn't make it.

  6. Bubba7700

    Bubba7700

    Ай мурун

    Hi Jay! Good video as usual. I'm way behind.... need to spend a couple weeks catching up if I ever have enough time. We've been testing engines back to back for months. Keep up the great work!

  7. Zyric 8

    Zyric 8

    Ай мурун

    Amazing channel. I love this channel

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      Ай мурун

      Thank you very much!

  8. Tech Worker

    Tech Worker

    Ай мурун

    A few years ago I was flown by a company into Quesnel BC for work. Now I get a idea just how remote your life is in FSJ. I do not live in Vancouver anymore. I moved back to Washington. Cost was out of control. Should have moved north :( but it is what it is. Love your explanation of this engine. BTW is air injected into the oil and is there a air/oil separator like that of a T58-GE engine?The more modern T58 used a carbon carbon seal. Care to explain what that type of seal is?

  9. Tom Dee

    Tom Dee

    Ай мурун

    I bet during a test, earthquake sensors can hear it.

  10. Mr.KiloWatt

    Mr.KiloWatt

    Ай мурун

    wow they designed these in the 40s and 50s before computers? so how did they measure all of those variables associated with this engine? was it designed with mathematical formulas by hand? would be cool to know about that. great channel!

    • Nate Lav

      Nate Lav

      28 күн мурун

      Even the SR-71 with every line curve and dent that could reflect radar back to a station and get it shot down was shaped and made with a slide rule! Seriously one mistake on the bottom of that plane and it would light up on radars like a christmas tree. Yet it was done with a slide rule.

  11. Graham Haynes

    Graham Haynes

    Ай мурун

    It's a lot safer now that remote cameras are used. The manufacturers won't allow folks into the cell when engines are running these days, especially at high power settings. Unfortunately, it can hamper the investigation of leaks etc. We had a turbine disc let go once. A piece of the disc smashed through the observation window, grazed the operators head and bounced off the control room wall. The operator was severely shaken and got a transfer to detail inspection. The test cell was used for testing three different engine types. Unfortunately, the HP turbine of one of those types lined up with the observation window. The window was subsequently modified!

    • EpicSpaceTroll 139

      EpicSpaceTroll 139

      Ай мурун

      @Graham Haynes Fair enough. Lots of lessons in engineering/test history have been learned through injury/loss of life. Glad this one wasn't! Hope you have a good day! :)

    • Graham Haynes

      Graham Haynes

      Ай мурун

      @EpicSpaceTroll 139 It happened in the 1970's. A lot of lessons have been learned since then.

    • EpicSpaceTroll 139

      EpicSpaceTroll 139

      Ай мурун

      Wow that's scary! Glad the operator made it. I wonder, why wasn't the window already armored? Or was it armored, just not for large pieces of turbine disk?

  12. Andrea Buzzolan

    Andrea Buzzolan

    Ай мурун

    Great video! I've a question, since sometimes you need to take apart the engine and then test it; all the procedures of unmounting parts are done in a different building closeby? can metallic dust be a problem for the engine? are dusty places a problem when working on jet engine? Thank you for your work!

  13. Peter Hodge

    Peter Hodge

    Ай мурун

    Great vid Jay

  14. BIGMUSCLE

    BIGMUSCLE

    Ай мурун

    Please answer this: So why is it more efficient to use the exhaust flow to drive a big fan (Turbofan engine) than it is to just simply allow it to flow freely out of the nozzle (TurboJet engine)??

    • BIGMUSCLE

      BIGMUSCLE

      Ай мурун

      @AgentJayZ Ah! I see, thanks for the explanation.

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      Ай мурун

      The greater the difference in speed between the propellant gas stream and the flight speed of the aircraft, the more energy is wasted on the turbulent mixing of the gas stream with the atmosphere.

  15. Mattias Devlin

    Mattias Devlin

    Ай мурун

    If my fridge makes the sound of an jet engine, I would find that rather exciting...

  16. Bruce Goodwin

    Bruce Goodwin

    Ай мурун

    Your most poetic post. Turbine prose. The 21st century Tempest!

  17. Clifton Brown

    Clifton Brown

    Ай мурун

    Are there a series of tests you can perform on a jet engine (CJ-610 series) to determine the engines health, without any teardown? Such that you might perform prior to purchasing a Lear 25.

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      Ай мурун

      The manual will list boroscope locations. Any competent A&P tech with experience on the CJ-610 is worth a couple hundred bucks an hour to talk to about this, and to hire to perform the inspection. Any Competent A&P tech without experience on the CJ-610 is worth150 an hour...

  18. Frank Hahn

    Frank Hahn

    Ай мурун

    tested PWC 300 series engines for 20 years

  19. LouT1501

    LouT1501

    Ай мурун

    Good video. And I've been to Fort St Johns, stopped and got fuel on my way to Alaska. There's risk in everything, impossible to eliminate it, just have to manage it best you can and it appears that you have. Every been up the road to Shepherd's Inn? One of my favorite spots.

  20. CMDR Sweeper

    CMDR Sweeper

    Ай мурун

    So these non FADEC engines do have nannies? Then how come that there is a warning for non FADEC aircraft to not slam the throttles forward to max power "Because you could exceed something"? A classic example is the takeoff thrust and one of the bragging rights of the Concorde back in its day was that they just smacked the thrust lever to full power for the takeoff while a DC-10 similarily had to be eased up to it.

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      Ай мурун

      1 - there are warnings about throttle control in the old jets, in the pilots manual. The rest of your comment is not true. The DC-10 had the CF6-6, and it would respond nicely to having the throttles instantly moved to 100%. No sweat. Any modern engine will do that. There are other reasons why airline pilots never so that. Even Concorde would never apply full power right at a standstill, but ease into it after moving forward some distance. The FADEC in modern engines performs the same duties as the FCU on the older ones. It does a much better job at it.

  21. Darren's workshop

    Darren's workshop

    Ай мурун

    Silly question time - do you point the engine opposite to the Earths rotation fearing slowing/ speeding up the rotation of the Earth with the engines on full power? LoL...

  22. Jo Andrade

    Jo Andrade

    Ай мурун

    Have you broken a turbine during a test❓

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      Ай мурун

      As explained before, no. Also, a turbine is an assembly of many blades in a disc. Discs can fail, and blades can break, but there is no such thing as "breaking a turbine". It's too vague.

  23. Doc8Ball's GearHead Gaming

    Doc8Ball's GearHead Gaming

    Ай мурун

    Man. This is the type of mechanics i should have got into lol. Looking for an Apprentice? Im Already Local lmao :P

  24. Jon T

    Jon T

    Ай мурун

    Hi Jay could you also include the similar 747 engine failure on Saturday in Europe? simpleflying.com/boeing-747-engine-parts-rain-down-on-dutch-village-after-engine-fire/

  25. Peter L.

    Peter L.

    Ай мурун

    man. you jinxed it for this week :-)

  26. grahamj9101

    grahamj9101

    Ай мурун

    I've looked at the video clips of the failed engine on the United Airlines B.777. However, I can't make out whether there is a fan blade missing, but the fan is obviously still rotating, and there is a heavy unbalance, consistent with a fan blade off. Please also see my comment about a fan blade failure on an Air Asia A330.

    • Sheila Walker

      Sheila Walker

      Ай мурун

      @AgentJayZ So essentially they will use the casing and stuff it full of new parts. I would not want a job like you perform in a rebuild like that. Too many judgement calls based in part on the experience of the mechanic. @grahamj9101 I wonder what modifications were made to the Trent FOHE? Care to guess? Jay and I discussed those stub pipes. Regardless of fault, they had no business being on those engines. As for the water landing, I think we can safely assume a Canada goose does not offer most appropriate fluid medium for most if not all turbine engines.

    • Sheila Walker

      Sheila Walker

      Ай мурун

      And they just grounded 24 777s. And... "Boeing released its own statement late Sunday, saying it recommended suspending the operation of every 777 that uses the Pratt & Whitney engines. It added 69 are currently in-service and 59 are in storage." Houston, we have a fan blade issue.

    • Sheila Walker

      Sheila Walker

      Ай мурун

      @grahamj9101 Thanks very much for the info and links! Some light reading for me tomorrow. I must be a bit demented. Metallurgy fascinates me. I blame it on my boss who once took a 30-06 barrel up to R 65 and fired it (remotely). Very very gnarly mess but interesting how the pieces revealed an assortment of stress characteristics.

    • grahamj9101

      grahamj9101

      Ай мурун

      @Sheila Walker I found the clip to which you refer and, yes, it does appears that there are portions of two blades missing. Where they went, I wouldn't like to guess: I'll wait for the NTSB report, as we all should. I will acknowledge that the Air Asia A330, to which I referred, was in cruise when it lost a fan blade, as it was about an hour out of Perth, Western Australia. If you check the ATSB report, you will find that about three-quarters of a fan blade was missing. In comparison, United flight 328 was reported to be at around 13,000ft, which looked about right from the video clips of the aircraft, the puff of smoke and the falling debris. Consequently, compared to the Trent 700 failure, the fan speed and the energy levels of the blade release in that PW 4000 would have been somewhat higher. I am, nevertheless, perturbed by the gross loss of engine cowling panels, and the apparent disruption of something that fed the fire. The Trent 700 does appear to have been somewhat more robust in this respect. In terms of what might and might not be re-used from that engine, while it will be stripped and minutely examined, my guess is that much of the fan, fan booster and HP compressor sections will end up in the scrap bin. The fan casing and the static structure around the front bearing housing, in particular, will have taken a considerable amount of damage. The design philosophy with which I am familiar is that, in the event of a fan blade off, the FBH support structure is actually designed to fail at a structural 'fuse', to allow the unbalanced fan rotor to rotate about its new centre of mass. The NTSB report will tell us how much damage there is in the engine, and it will make interesting reading. Did you ever read the report on the engines from US Airways flight 1549, or the ATSB report on the engine from QF32? And the AAIB report on the investigation into flight BA38, which crash-landed at LHR, was fascinating - for an engineer.

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      Ай мурун

      Sheila, wherever that engine ends up, it will be disassembled to the last nut and washer. The big pieces will be inspected dimensionally for plastic deformation due to the monstrous forces they endured. If they are out of spec, they will be destroyed. If not, they will be inspected for cracks. If any are found that are outside the repair schemes, they will be scrapped. Then, millions of dollars of new parts will be used to reassemble the engine into zero timed overhauled condition. It will be identical to a new engine.

  27. Sheila Walker

    Sheila Walker

    Ай мурун

    Hi Jay. No brainer with United Airlines flight 328 engine coming apart. Front cowling around the fan housing blew off and a passenger grabbed a shot of the front of the engine while in flight. One fan blade is clearly pictured, broken roughly in half. Fortunately it appeared to be contained; the engine casing looks intact. No damage to wing or fuselage mentioned. Lucky!

    • Sheila Walker

      Sheila Walker

      Ай мурун

      @grahamj9101 Just what Boeing needs following the 737 Max debacle; 5632 fan blades heading for the lab. This recent incident did have an excursion, whether principle incident or secondary is academic at this point. It is going to be interesting what corporate wriggling and wheeling and dealing comes down with the 777X coming on very strong and GE and RR newest engines strolling passed the competition.

    • George Robartes

      George Robartes

      Ай мурун

      The difference between Rolls Royce and P&W apart from quality is the inlet ring on the 777 and P&W engines in general . The RR engines have a much deep inlet that contains compressor blades flying off . The last 777 blade actually struck the fuselage as it cut the inlet ring off on it way . This is classified as an uncontained failure as internal engine parts were allowed outside the nacelle . Its disastrous for P&W as these blades are pretty low tech when compared to the latest RR multi pitch and angle Ultra Fan types . I'm guessing you that we may see much deeper inlet rings as a result .

    • pinkdispatcher

      pinkdispatcher

      Ай мурун

      @AgentJayZ In this video: kgkey.info/block/0Xd6oNGPkLGXpG0/video.html it looks to me as if one and a half blades are missing if you go frame-by-frame. Maybe one broke off at the root, and it took half of another one with it, as sometimes can be seen in the certification blade-off tests.

    • grahamj9101

      grahamj9101

      Ай мурун

      @AgentJayZ Sorry, AgentJayZ: it ain't necessarily so. In 2017, a Trent 700 engine on an Air Asia A330 lost a fan blade. The engine cowling remained intact. There are video clips elsewhere on KGkey, which show the failed engine shaking away on the wing, much like the engine on the United B.777. There are also clips of the cabin, showing the passengers being shaken, "like sitting on a washing machine", which they had to endure for two hours.

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      Ай мурун

      Hmmm, your eyes must be better. I watched the clip several times and could not see that. It would explain the shaking. If even half a fan blade "departed" at climbout power, the violence of the shaking would cause the cowling to be ripped to pieces.

  28. Bulldozer

    Bulldozer

    Ай мурун

    Nothing will get your attention like a J57-59w in water and your adjusting the fuel control 'up' one more click and it coughs while hanging on the wing 😀

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      Ай мурун

      A J57 on your wing? What, you got seven more to carry you through... Or are you flying an Americanized Canberra?

  29. Roy Segal

    Roy Segal

    Ай мурун

    Hello Agent, are you able to refer to the United airlines engine fire video and explain what was going on there?

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      Ай мурун

      That will be happening soon. I have watched the same clip you have seen, but I think I might wait until Blancolirio supplies us with a few more details.

  30. Oscar Thorpe

    Oscar Thorpe

    Ай мурун

    6:36 212 horsepower? are you thinking of a 2004 ford focus RS or a 2004 honda civic type R

  31. Dan Lemke

    Dan Lemke

    Ай мурун

    Some of us old jet engine mechanics that worked on the older jets such as the T-33 (F-80) were Leary of the blades egressing the aircraft, as you could see the patches on the empennage where it happened a few times. It is the reason most military jets had a red line painted where the turbine blade was, as it was not a spot where you wanted to hang out at. Military jet engines are trimmed (tuned) for the mission they are used for. For example, there is a peace time trim, and a war time trim for most military applications for obvious reasons, so 100% isn't always the norm. Jet engines as I knew them generally idle at 60%, so like he mentioned in the video, it is very unlike a car that idles at about 10%. Jet engines are usually not throttled about simply due to exhaust temps, but they do need to set them at less than 100% most of the time. Not sure about the light switch rational, but he was trying to make a point. There is an application where the jet is run at two speeds, idle and 100%, and that is a constant speed, with a variable pitched propeller affixed to a gearbox that is mounted on the front of the jet. So, the speed is adjusted only by the pitch of the prop, even allowing it to reverse. There are so many variations and applications of the jet engine, that it would be difficult to encapsulate all of them in one video on the dangers of working on jets, but I would say from my many hours in a test cell, that the most dangerous part is the very beginning of the start up on an engine that has been apart. It would be fuel leaks (we burned up a 2million dollar J-75), and vibration of something that is unbalanced mostly in the turbine section. We use vibration pickups to monitor this and would immediately shut down an engine that exceeded norms. In conclusion, jet engines are very safe to be around, or they wouldn't be around. In public anyways...

  32. Jennifer WhiteWolf

    Jennifer WhiteWolf

    Ай мурун

    People that use automotive internal combustion engines in marine applications also endure highly elevated failure issues because of extended time at higher power output levels. Excellent discussion on the principles of %power.

  33. Rob Albert

    Rob Albert

    Ай мурун

    Curious as to your pretest FOD check in the test cell and the path of intake air in those close quarters. Great videos, thanks!

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      Ай мурун

      That's the subject of an upcoming vid. Stay tuned!

  34. Josectre

    Josectre

    Ай мурун

    Yes, refrigerators are tested at the end of the production line. All of them are. I have worked in that industry for many years now.

  35. canna roe

    canna roe

    Ай мурун

    "Now, me and the mad scientist got to rip apart the block, and replace the turbine discs you fried." Everyone in 500 yards: 😨

  36. Luke Walker

    Luke Walker

    Ай мурун

    Save yourself the 30mins. No. No it is not dangerous.

  37. Bob Rice

    Bob Rice

    Ай мурун

    I my experience the HP compessor case is the only thing to fail. It runs the cowling and often wraps it round the slats as take off is when it is most likely to fail. I've never heard of the turbine letting go. If the fan blades fail they are restrained by the fan case.

    • Matthijs van Duin

      Matthijs van Duin

      Ай мурун

      The Progress D-18T turbofan engine of the An-124 has also seen two uncontained failures last year, one in March 2020 with no details known other than that it was traced to the second-stage disk of the intermediate pressure compressor, and the more publicized fan disk failure in November

    • grahamj9101

      grahamj9101

      Ай мурун

      In 2010, the No.2 Trent engine of Qantas flight QF32 had an uncontained failure of its IP turbine disc (it's discussed elsewhere here). This was not because of any defect in the disc, but was as a result of a raging oil fire that grossly overheated the drive arm of the disc, which then twisted itself off the turbine shaft. The IP turbine was then driven to overspeed and burst in around 120 miliseconds. There are no casings on any jet engines flying that will resist a major disc failure, whether compressor or turbine. As I've mentioned elsewhere, there were uncontained failures of both fan and HP turbine discs in the early days of the RB211 on Tristars - and to maintain some balance, there have been similar failures on engines of US origin. Fortunately, such failures are extremely rare.

  38. RohrAtom

    RohrAtom

    Ай мурун

    Very interesting stuff!

  39. Anthony Pegues

    Anthony Pegues

    2 ай мурун

    Well, if you think the engines aren’t hot rodded then you were never in the Military

  40. Al Smith

    Al Smith

    2 ай мурун

    Great video, but one thing that's not quite right... Aeroplane manufacturers do design for turbine disc failures. They can't stop the disc from going through the structures, but the trajectory of the "high energy debris" of the disc fragments is modelled, and no "singe point of failure" can be within these zones.... i.e. Structures in those zones have to have multiple redundant load paths, and systems (electrics, hydraulics etc.) are routed to either avoid these debris hazard zones or are duplexed to ensure continued functionality.

    • grahamj9101

      grahamj9101

      Ай мурун

      @Dan Lemke I was fairly sure that I'd come across references to the B-52 using water injection on take off, and old film clips certainly showed them producing far more smoke than can be seen with the current model. I've checked with Wikipedia, which tells me that the early marks with J57s used water injection for take-off, fed from a 360 gallon tank in the rear fuselage.

    • Dan Lemke

      Dan Lemke

      Ай мурун

      @grahamj9101 The KC-135 tanker also used water injection to get the heavy loads in the air. The biggest difference I noticed was the noise! They didn't seem to make much more exhaust smoke. The Buffs didn't have water injection that I was aware of and like the F-4, they just burned a lot of fuel and oil to make the blue smoke that actually made them easier to target. It was the engine itself that was the issue, not water injection. Most probably don't know, but jets require synthetic oils to run due to heat, and they use quite a bit of it, at least the older jets I worked on did.

    • EL GRAN LEON

      EL GRAN LEON

      Ай мурун

      @grahamj9101 There is a gas turbine lying on the road, and I am making a video of it, this one since 1980 and it is a J 32 allison, with 14 combustion chamber, single stage sentrifugal compressor

    • grahamj9101

      grahamj9101

      Ай мурун

      @Al Smith An otherwise undamaged disc, whether a compressor or a turbine disc, will fail in overspeed, to produce three 120degree segments. A failure resulting from an incipient flaw in the disc is more likely to produce multiple pieces of debris. During my career, I saw numerous photos of discs that had been failed on an overspeed test in a spin pit, to produce three segments. That is essentially what happened to the IP turbine disc of the No.2 Trent engine on QF32. One segment of the disc was found on the island of Batam, only hours after the event. Having seen a photo of it, I immediately set down my hypothesis of the root cause of the failure, which was subsequently shown to be essentially correct. However, there is also plenty of high energy 'shrapnel', which is produced as a result of the initial failure, including released turbine blades and chunks of the turbine casing. Those small holes in the wing could only have been produced by 'shrapnel'. A380 'Nancy Bird Walton' and its passengers were extremely lucky, in that the trajectory of none of the three disc segments went through the fuselage. But then so were the passengers on some early Tristar flights, when RB211 engines experienced uncontained failures of fan and HP turbine discs. Not so lucky were the passengers on the DC10 flight that came down at Sioux City in 1989. Fortunately, such events are extremely rare, and becoming rarer.

    • grahamj9101

      grahamj9101

      Ай мурун

      @EL GRAN LEON Water injection permits an increase in thrust, without an excessive increase in turbine entry temperature, for a short period, on take-off. Its function is to provide a cooling effect on the combustion products, a by-product of which may be the production of smoke, to a greater or lesser degree. B-52s had it, which is why they produced so much smoke on take-off in those old film clips. BAC 1-11 airliners also had it and Harrier jump jets still have it. If you see a clip of a Harrier performing a vertical take-off, with visible smoke coming from the 'hot' nozzles, it will be using water injection. Operationally, it should normally be used for a 'short lift wet' take-off rating, with a maximum load of stores, when performing a rolling take-off, with partially deflected nozzles. My recollection is that the Harrier carried enough water/methanol for a maximum of 90 seconds usage.

  41. Talkie Toaster

    Talkie Toaster

    2 ай мурун

    Watching this from the UK, I could have sworn I was watching "FUBAR" about 12 minutes in! "Can't just giv'er, wait a min buddy...". Greasy.

  42. GNX157

    GNX157

    2 ай мурун

    JZ I watched the whole video about is it safe but I’ll ask you this. On a turbofan engine, such as the recent Southwest Airlines uncontained engine failure where one person died, would you feel safe walking around in your test cell or in the control booth if that engine had been in your shop, with its shroud on?

    • Silas Marner

      Silas Marner

      Ай мурун

      He never proposed walking around it while at rated power did he? Or did I miss something?

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      Wrong question. Would I feel safe testing a freshly overhauled CFM56 turbofan? Yes. We could "what if" to the back side of infinity. Not doing that. Too busy living in the world...

  43. Nick Sexton

    Nick Sexton

    2 ай мурун

    AgentJayZ, your humour is amazing, so well delivered. Thanks for a little bit of a chuckle in these depressing times

  44. ChangefromaBill

    ChangefromaBill

    2 ай мурун

    A stock engine corvette holds three world records for continuous top speed of thirty hours. Set in 1990 or so. Saw a video of it at the museum in Bowling Green. The new ones are dyno tested for much longer during development. Several days if I remember correctly

  45. Thomas Belmont

    Thomas Belmont

    2 ай мурун

    I love the fuel controller as a great example of ‘slide rule engineering’. It’s really magnificent what they managed to accomplish in the early jet age in such a short period of time. Separately, I suppose a classic automatic transmission is also an analog computer, although much simpler.

  46. sledawgpilot

    sledawgpilot

    2 ай мурун

    Our South Dakota state governor was killed in a Mitsubishi MU-2 by a propeller blade coming off. The engine engine was then cocked off to the side and the plane couldn’t hold altitude. It went down into lousy weather where when they broke out of the overcast they hit a silo. That said I have a couple thousand hours in a plane with the same type engines TPE331 (690B) where it would have sucked to lose a blade but I didn’t lose any sleep worrying

  47. Ben I

    Ben I

    2 ай мурун

    Turbines in modern aircraft are designed to contain failures. This is why uncontained failures are big news. But to achieve this they generally use materials like kevlar to handle the stupid energy involved. Also with FADEC they tend to use software to help. Example the Trent900 on the A380 had a software change post QF32's uncontained failure (when the second spool turbine disk burst following a failure that decoupled it second spool compressor... with the insane RPM increase that would result!) from the inter that would prevent a similar disk burst by using the processing speed of the FADEC to cut the fuel flow when the turbine speed exceeded a certain RPM (which was well above normal operation but would ensure run down prior to reaching failure rpm).

    • grahamj9101

      grahamj9101

      Ай мурун

      @Ben I Some engines also have a mechanical shut off, in the event of an LP turbine failure. The Olympus 593 did and so did one mark of the Trent.

    • Ben I

      Ben I

      Ай мурун

      Awesome thanks Graham! Thanks for the for the clarity. I should have been explicit... Jay would not approve. I did mean blade failure for the casing. Of course the idea being that anything escaping goes out the back in the exhaust flow. Disks can't be contained physically. The software is designed to sense when they are approaching dangerous speeds and shut the fuel flow off to prevent the burst in the first place.

    • grahamj9101

      grahamj9101

      Ай мурун

      There are no casings on any engines flying today that can contain the total failure of a disc, whether that of a fan, compressor or turbine disc. The design philosophy is to make such an event extremely improbable, through careful design, rigorous control of manufacture and extensive testing. If engines had containment shields capable of containing such a failure, they would be incapable of flying, as they would be far too heavy. In fact, it would be impossible to come up with a sensible design. However, there are engines out there that, in certain cases, have containment shields intended to contain multiple blade failures. And, of course, the big turbofans have containment features, such as Kevlar, around their fan casings, which are designed to contain the release of a single fan blade. You may be interested to know that the last mark of the Pegasus engine in the Harrier jump jet, has an Armco containment ring fitted into the aluminium casing above the first stage of the three-stage fan. This is designed to contain the release of the portion of a single blade from above the snubber (aka mid-span shroud in N America). The engine would fail, of course, but the design intent is to prevent major damage to the airframe, including a fuel tank, and give the pilot enough time to eject.

    • Ben I

      Ben I

      2 ай мурун

      Also an important point for the Jay's test cell is that not only does the J79 WAY predate the containment requirements... And in its flight version it was a military engine which has different standards. But the cowling on a modern turbine is also part of the containment system. This is why test cells for commercial engines use the same principles as this cell, the turbine is offset from the control window. They also tend to have much thicker walls and glass... But I believe this is more the volume of testing they need to do in commercial engines and the desire to have the test team not needing hearing protection. The bigger cells at major airports also tend to be sound proofed so you can test your average commercial engine and make no more noise than a vacuum cleaner. This allows them to use the cell 24hrs a day as there is virtually no external noise. Of course it's easier to sound proof when you don't need to test afterburning engines!

  48. joe julian

    joe julian

    2 ай мурун

    I love his last remark, that should apply to everything!

  49. Who you looking at? abs

    Who you looking at? abs

    2 ай мурун

    hey Jay, I have a question. You said in Jet Questions 67 that water goes through the Bypass Duct on a Turbofan because of Centrifugal Force, what about a Turbojet?

    • Who you looking at? abs

      Who you looking at? abs

      Ай мурун

      @AgentJayZ I Meant during the Extreme Engine Water ingestion test where they Dump Hundreds of gallons into an engine

    • grahamj9101

      grahamj9101

      Ай мурун

      @AgentJayZ In the limit, I believe it is possible that a turbojet could be made to flame out as a result of an extreme water ingestion event - and I think it may have actually happened in flight, in the dim and distant past. I have previously told the story of the Proteus turboprop in the Bristol Britannia, which suffered flame-outs during test flights in unusual icing conditions over Africa (I think it was), in the early 1950s. If you find a cross-sectional GA of the engine, you will see that it has a reverse-flow arrangement and a radial air intake, similar to that of the P&W PT6 engine. This arrangement resulted in a long inlet duct around the engine, with a 180degree turn of the air forward into the compressor. It was discovered, the hard way during flight tests, that under certain conditions, ice would build up in the intake and large lumps would drop off, to be harmlessly 'minced' by the compressor. However, the combustors didn't like the experience of a large amount of water suddenly being delivered to them and they flamed out. It was soon established that the icing phenomenon only occurred occasionally under predictable atmospheric conditions, and that it only needed the igniters to be switched on to alleviate the problem, with no more than a momentary loss of power. Nevertheless, BOAC, the prime customer for the aircraft, demanded that an anti-icing solution for the intake be developed and tested, which delayed EIS by two years and the loss of sales to other airlines.

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      You need to clarify what you mean by "water" ... what amount. All of it will go through the core of a turbojet, but no naturally occurring amount of rain will impair the function of the engine. The heaviest rainfall in the world: a turbojet does not care.

  50. zapfanzapfan

    zapfanzapfan

    2 ай мурун

    So, the fuel controller is like a good bartender :-)

  51. kurt74ful

    kurt74ful

    2 ай мурун

    Hi Agent Jayz Question! You have answered a ton of them already that I never thaught to ask. I'm just a carpenter down in new Zealand no such career in avionics or turbine generators.. So the question remains to me unanswered.. In say the jet boat and or a helicopter how does the turbine engage with the jet unit or propeller and be totally controlled as desired in relation to the turbine spinning at x thousand rpm ?

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      1 power turbine 2 reduction gearbox 3 the main fuel control is quite sophisticated.

  52. grahamj9101

    grahamj9101

    2 ай мурун

    Testing both repair and overhaul and production engines is usually a very routine event, but as AgentJayZ has mentioned, development testing can be a different matter. The failure of a Olympus 22R engine, back in 1962 , is still remembered locally. The engine, destined to power the ill-fated TSR2, was slung under the belly of a Vulcan FTB, and was being run up to full power on the airfield at Filton. The LP turbine shaft failed, the turbine disc was released whole and sliced into the fuel tanks in the aircraft's wing. The fuel pooled on the ground and caught fire, destroying both the aircraft and a brand-new fire engine. The disc bowled across the airfield for several hundred yards, reportedly bouncing every 150 feet, coming to rest just a few feet short of the Bristol T188 research aircraft (which I actually saw coming in to land a few years later). I also heard another story of an engine test that was carried out by Bristol Aero Engines in a disused railway tunnel, where a turbine disc was deliberately released. The disc reportedly ran around the tunnel several times before running out of energy and falling to the floor.

  53. Glenn Edward Pace

    Glenn Edward Pace

    2 ай мурун

    Doesn’t the compressor assembly spin at the same rpm as the turbine?

    • Glenn Edward Pace

      Glenn Edward Pace

      Ай мурун

      AgentJayZ is asjcs explanation correct? Honest question not trying to troll

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      Ай мурун

      EGP: what you see or don't see, and what you understand or don't understand... is irrelevant. It does not make this an argument or a debate. it means you need to learn how the world works, so get to it.

    • ASJC27

      ASJC27

      2 ай мурун

      @Glenn Edward Pace The total mass doesn't matter. What matters is the mass of each rotating disk, and that is higher in the turbines. If you have 10 rotating disks weighing 50 kg each (not that a jet is like that - each stage is different), connected rigidly to 2 disks weighing 100 kg each, which is under more stress? The heavier disks are, even if the total assembly mass is lighter. The blades themselves are also much lighter in the compressor. They are very thin, almost like knives. Turbine blades are "fat", and are often made of heavier metals than early compressor stages. Also, when a turbine bursts it isn't just the blades that come loose, it's a burst of the entire disk, usually into three 120 degree segments, and as a turbine disk is much heavier than a compressor disk, these segments contain more energy. The huge temperature difference also makes it less likely for a compressor to burst.

    • Glenn Edward Pace

      Glenn Edward Pace

      2 ай мурун

      ASJC27 the compressor is probably heavier due to it having so many stages. I don’t see why a blade coming loose in the compressor is any less dangerous than in the turbine

    • ASJC27

      ASJC27

      2 ай мурун

      @Glenn Edward Pace Heavier rotors, high temperatures.

  54. Les Goodwin

    Les Goodwin

    2 ай мурун

    Dear Agent jayZ, Love your stuff, just an old printer from down under, but have learnt SO MUCH, from you. Hope you & yours are safe and well. Thank you. Les

  55. Idea-ology

    Idea-ology

    2 ай мурун

    so... i have a strange question.... Is there any place you can buy like.... parts of these engines?? Cause they look so cool, and I would love to like hang one one my wall or something

    • Idea-ology

      Idea-ology

      2 ай мурун

      @AgentJayZ I mean I did search around but I dont really know what to search for... If I search for scrap I get complete engines, if I search for parts I get new parts, and if I search for "scrap parts" I get recycled parts... So no I did put forth effort... I'm just not a jet engine technician, so I don't know what I'm doing/looking for...

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      Yes, there is a huge aftermarket for spares and scrap. The fact that you didn't know that means you have put zero effort into your search so far. My assistance to you has come to an end.

  56. orcasea59

    orcasea59

    2 ай мурун

    Okay, this might be a stupid question, but (in a single shaft turbojet) why does the turbine section (turning at the same RPM) have so much more energy than the compressor section? Is it the material of the blades? That, alone, doesn't seem like enough of a difference to create such a difference in energy...?

    • James Seifeddine

      James Seifeddine

      Ай мурун

      no it's P=M*V 😂😂

    • platonicsolid

      platonicsolid

      2 ай мурун

      @orcasea59 momentum = M*V^2

    • orcasea59

      orcasea59

      2 ай мурун

      @AgentJayZ Thanks, that makes sense. F = M*V. I should have remembered that!

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      It's all just a lot heavier. A compressor disc weighs about 10 lbs, and has about that much in blades attached to it. A turbine disc is ten times as thick. It weighs over a hundred lbs, and has about 50lbs in blading attached. Going five hundred mph, a garbage can lid is going to really damage a car. A manhole cover is going to go right through ten cars in a row. Sorta like that.

  57. Sheila Walker

    Sheila Walker

    2 ай мурун

    Nowhere near as hazardous as imminent brain damage from fielding certain questions, yes? Okay, let me get this straight. You test rebuilt engines that have undergone an extremely thorough inspection and brought up to or exceeding original design specifications. All of these engines have already proven themselves in operation for years. Additionally this is a test lab, not a normal circumstances situation, being carefully monitored by experts, the critical engine data being watched like a hawk. And then, this being a test, if any unusual condition occurs, this is exactly what you want and will shut down the test immediately to check out what occurred in as close to real time as possible Read, in the least likely category of turbine engines in general to undergo an uncontained catastrophic failure. People have been watching way way way way way too many trauma drama Hollyweird movies. Suggestion. Spice up your videos. Stand there clutching a live goose which you appear to be about to throw into the intake while everyone in the building is running out in panic!

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      Have I told you, Sheila, just how much I love you? I will!

  58. Dozer1642

    Dozer1642

    2 ай мурун

    If it wasn’t for the comment section of KGkey, we would never be told how dangerous everyday actions are by people that have never done them.

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      Oh, you bet, Dozer !

  59. Vince Waldon

    Vince Waldon

    2 ай мурун

    Curious about how engine thrust is measured in your test cell, as I don't see any obvious load cell instrumentation. At the engine mounts, perhaps?

    • Vince Waldon

      Vince Waldon

      2 ай мурун

      ​@AgentJayZ Thanks for the response.... yep I was thinking the cradle in your older videos looks like it can pivot, which would be more suitable for load cell measurements. Once an engineer always an engineer I guess.Thanks again!

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      Yes, we built a thrust test stand years ago for the J79. It is actually easier to use than this old clunker, which it replaced. I don't know why the crew used this mount, and I didn't ask. The usual, and correct one has a pivoting cradle, to which the engine is attached. The cradle transfers the thrust through piezoelectric links to the rigid anchor. Here, they have used the old anchor to hold the engine directly.

  60. William Miller

    William Miller

    2 ай мурун

    When I worked at RR, we used to say we stand behind our engines, but never beside them!

    • zapfanzapfan

      zapfanzapfan

      2 ай мурун

      It's like the opposite of a trebuchet :-)

  61. George P Briles

    George P Briles

    2 ай мурун

    Nice channel man 👍 I love the vids, u can learn a lot on this channel, great work Jay!

  62. haraldhannelius

    haraldhannelius

    2 ай мурун

    Isn't there a temperature sensor controlling fuel flow too? Both the temp of the fuel and the outside air?

    • ASJC27

      ASJC27

      2 ай мурун

      @AgentJayZ Modern EFI is also a closed-loop system. The loop is closed around the reading of the lambda sensor, i.e. it actively adjusts the amount of fuel injection to reach a desired air-fuel ratio.

    • haraldhannelius

      haraldhannelius

      2 ай мурун

      @AgentJayZ thank You!

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      Fuel is pumped in until the fuel control is happy. It monitors EGT, RPM, and power level requested. Unlike EFI in a car, it is a closed loop system. Amount of fuel flowing is measured as a convenience to allow the crew to calculate what they have left.

    • haraldhannelius

      haraldhannelius

      2 ай мурун

      @AgentJayZ interesting, thanks. Fuel metered by weight?

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      There is an inlet air temp sensor, but fuel temp does not matter.

  63. Hadinos Sanosam

    Hadinos Sanosam

    2 ай мурун

    Why is a turbine failure so much more damaging than a compressor failure? Are the required heat resistant materials that much heavier?

    • KJ Dude

      KJ Dude

      2 ай мурун

      The individual compressor blades are much lighter in mass and material than the turbines. Less rotational mass is less energy at the same speed. And lower inertial mass is easier to stop.

  64. MrLunithy

    MrLunithy

    2 ай мурун

    I worked in a power station that ran old turbine ...comsberge? little 2 or 5 megawatt.... cant remember correct spelling sorry .......when they started up it was funny to see new people just go all WTF! as it run up to idle.

    • MrLunithy

      MrLunithy

      2 ай мурун

      @Atle Olav Dahl Yes and thank you I found a video with the correct spelling kgkey.info/block/wH-tpqq2brp5uZg/video.html

    • Atle Olav Dahl

      Atle Olav Dahl

      2 ай мурун

      Probably Kongsberg. Made by A division of Kongsberg Våpenfabrikk in Kongsberg, Norway. Acquired by Dresser-Rand in 1987. Rumor has it that they used air-cooled VW Beetle engines as starting engines when testing the the turbines, and at least once the mechanism that was supposed to automatically disconnect the VW engine from the gas turbine as it revved up failed.

  65. Andrea Loi

    Andrea Loi

    2 ай мурун

    Racecars on a track, bullets on a firing range, bulls running through the streets in Pamplona... Staying out of the way is almost often the best safety measure.

  66. MD Juwel Student

    MD Juwel Student

    2 ай мурун

    ধন্যবাদ আপনাকে

  67. BamBamBatMan

    BamBamBatMan

    2 ай мурун

    Sounds Dangerous.

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      It sounds extremely dangerous... but it's not.

  68. ugalas

    ugalas

    2 ай мурун

    Damn good vid mate!

  69. jim5870

    jim5870

    2 ай мурун

    I think the engine is in more danger from people in the test cell than the other way around. i.e someone's hat comes off and it finds the intake.

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      Yeah, that's why no dumbasses are allowed at the test cell.

  70. solo2r

    solo2r

    2 ай мурун

    How about putting the whole frame structure at an angle even just a few degrees toward the corner of building

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      The plane of rotation is already far away from the control booth. Did you watch the video where I explained that? Put your helmet on, and eat your paste... downstairs, in the corner, with the lights off.

    • solo2r

      solo2r

      2 ай мурун

      @AgentJayZ Just to get the line of rotation more away from booth. I know it was mentioned it is rare for anything to explode, any little thing could prevent a potential event. Thx for your videos!

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      What for?

  71. Brian Cox

    Brian Cox

    2 ай мурун

    If a turbine disk lets go, I'd imagine anyone in the control room is going to have an emotional experience and browned pants. Hopefully, that is the limit of "effects" on them.

  72. Joe Danay

    Joe Danay

    2 ай мурун

    Good to see you again!

  73. The Fixer Of Broken Stuff

    The Fixer Of Broken Stuff

    2 ай мурун

    Probably a sight more dangerous building the engine than testing it.

  74. Parris George

    Parris George

    2 ай мурун

    Chevette!!! A truly awful car.

  75. dinosaur complaints

    dinosaur complaints

    2 ай мурун

    When you go to the basement, don’t forget to take Mr Binky with you!

  76. dinosaur complaints

    dinosaur complaints

    2 ай мурун

    Sounds like a detroit diesel, wind it up till it stops screaming, shift a gear, stand on it.

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      Years ago, when I was racing bikes, we would race at night at a little track that also held stock car races on the same night. A car crew chief wanders through the pits, over to my buddy who rides a Yamaha R6 with a screaming open exhaust collector. Chief says "What the heck is the redline on that thing?" Jed says "Fifteen five" Chief: " What do you shift at?" Jed: "Fifteen five!" ... I am still smiling at that exchange between the car world and the bike world.

  77. Allan Copland

    Allan Copland

    2 ай мурун

    Agent JayZ does a nominal 100 percent. Pure Dyno, as they say in Greenock, Scotland.

    • Ryan Jess

      Ryan Jess

      Ай мурун

      Just down the road from where I grew up :)

  78. sski

    sski

    2 ай мурун

    LOL! Love that last bit. So many people these days seem to prefer the helmet/basement corner/lights out lifestyle these days. Especially over this sweet & sour shivers nonsense. Thanks for going over the basics of the test cell. Stuff does happen, rarely. But if you do your job correctly from the git-go, that rarely turns into an improbability.

    • Doug Bourdo

      Doug Bourdo

      2 ай мурун

      Absolutely. Best description ever... especially for our current times !!!

  79. SkyhawkSteve

    SkyhawkSteve

    2 ай мурун

    your test cell is fairly similar to the diesel engine test cells at my former employer. Thick armored glass so you can see if anything has gone wrong (fuel or oil leaks, piston flying through the engine block, etc), some sound-proofing material on the walls, lots of instrumentation, and a way to control the engine being tested. I imagine the tests were similar too... kinda fun at first, but then a bit tedious.

  80. riflebone

    riflebone

    2 ай мурун

    "Given 'er" - Is there a more eponymous Canadian expression for maximum effort? "Let's take that Orenda out fer' a rip dere bye and we'll giver". Love it! Great vid as always JayZ.

  81. Joe Vignolo

    Joe Vignolo

    2 ай мурун

    In the Air Guard we had F-100's that used J-57 engines with afterburners. We didn't have a test cell so we had to install the engines into an F-100 to test them. Then we would tow or taxi the whole airplane minus the tail assembly out to a pad and chain it to two anchor points sunk into the ground. Then we'd fire it up. We would walk all around it while it was running. The only safety rule was to avoid standing in line with the turbine. It was amazing being that close to a running jet engine, especially while it was in afterburner.

  82. Callum McGurk

    Callum McGurk

    2 ай мурун

    Of course it's not going to blow up on the stand. It's just been pulled apart and inspected in minute detail, balanced, checked and then assembled using only good parts. For a machine to fail it has to have a defect, and in many cases a pretty serious one. Given the attention to detail used in overhauling a jet engine, it's probably the least likely thing to fail during testing after a nuclear reactor. The fact that the team who put it together are perfectly happy to stand next to it whilst running shows the amount of care taken. Also, nobody panics when their plane is taking off because the engines are running at takeoff power.

  83. Greg Helms

    Greg Helms

    2 ай мурун

    Dig it.

  84. AD Electronic Teardowns

    AD Electronic Teardowns

    2 ай мурун

    The Southwest uncontained failure that killed the woman was quite away from direction of rotation, given many factors I believe a piece of case hit window...

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      No. It was a piece of the nacelle that hit the window. That's airplane parts, not engine.

  85. Kane Hira

    Kane Hira

    2 ай мурун

    stupid people dislike this video because they have no job and didn't finish school and aren't smart enough to be anything in life

  86. welltell

    welltell

    2 ай мурун

    To be totally safe, put your helmet on, go to the basement and turn the lights off. AFTER you hit the BIG RED abort BUTTON. lol

  87. ziomoto san

    ziomoto san

    2 ай мурун

    maybe better to use a cage on the intake.

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      I think I may have to make a video about that, because I've explained it too many times. We use the same engine protection from FOD you will find at every airport in the entire world. Every last one.

    • Don Rideout

      Don Rideout

      2 ай мурун

      Eventually they came up with a screen.

  88. Don Rideout

    Don Rideout

    2 ай мурун

    Worked on the Sabre when I was stationed in Germany, a groundcrew was doing a full run up on sabre another groundcrew made the mistake of crawling between nosewheel and intake, he was sucked into engine never survived.

  89. Alexander470815

    Alexander470815

    2 ай мурун

    I guess the propane has to be very hot to not condense back into a liquid under these pressures? Because ist must overcome the pressure inside the combustor to even get it in, or is there some kind of special injector in it? For natural gas this is of course not a problem.

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      The propane is heated to about 100C. The fuel nozzles used can be seen in my videos called Jet Fuel Nozzles

    • Joe Vignolo

      Joe Vignolo

      2 ай мурун

      Jet engines used in airplanes don't run on propane or natural gas. They run on jet fuel, which is basically liquid kerosene. In some cases turbine engines are converted for industrial use and they do burn natural gas instead of jet fuel. In any case the compressor discharge pressure and the discharge pressure of the fuel supply (using either liquid or gaseous fuel) must be higher than the pressure inside the combustion section so as to maintain positive flow going into the combustors.

  90. Donald Stanfield

    Donald Stanfield

    2 ай мурун

    The earth turns a little faster when AgentJayZ gooses those J-79s - WHEEEEEEEEEE!

  91. Mark Deavult

    Mark Deavult

    2 ай мурун

    The pace of advancement in the 1940s and 1950s was incredible. In two decades, we went from the first jet engines, to the SR-71 and Concorde. I wonder if the engineers who designed models like the Orenda and J79 had any idea or expectation that their efforts would still be relied upon in the third decade of the 21st Century? That’s a testament to brilliant design.

  92. Remigiusz Marcinkiewicz

    Remigiusz Marcinkiewicz

    2 ай мурун

    "It's idlin' " at 4:45 sounded exactly like "it's restin'" in the Monty Python parrot sketch.

    • sski

      sski

      2 ай мурун

      @AgentJayZ LOL!!

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      Why that's a compliment, sir! We don't actually handle compliments here. That's across the hall...

  93. Ever443

    Ever443

    2 ай мурун

    Great video Thanks

  94. Alex-GenTLe

    Alex-GenTLe

    2 ай мурун

    It's funny that "Orenda" sounds a lot like Italian word "orrenda" which translates into "hideous" or "horrendous" adjective for a female noun :D

  95. Jim Lunde

    Jim Lunde

    2 ай мурун

    Fascinating, thank you. I guess for an average to below intelligence guy like me, just don't pump too much fuel in there and you'll be OK. Appreciate your videos.

  96. Lister Dave

    Lister Dave

    2 ай мурун

    What are the three thick electrical cables going in to the front of the engine for?

    • Daren Page

      Daren Page

      2 ай мурун

      Looks the connections for a three phase starter/alternator

  97. Ed Dean

    Ed Dean

    2 ай мурун

    I saw a CFM-56-3 that had sucked an fiberglass and aluminum ladder into it. The test cell crew had forgotten it. Two millon dollar damage.

    • Matthijs van Duin

      Matthijs van Duin

      Ай мурун

      Whoopsiedoodle

    • William Miller

      William Miller

      2 ай мурун

      Ouch

    • IcthioVelocipede

      IcthioVelocipede

      2 ай мурун

      Wow. That's a hell of an expensive ladder!

  98. thomas m. tordel jr.

    thomas m. tordel jr.

    2 ай мурун

    "..and turn out the lights." LMAO!! now, you HAVE made mods to certain engine parts but, thats been to improve reliability, not "performance". I'm referring to the ceramic coating process.

  99. chris

    chris

    2 ай мурун

    how much would we have to raise for you to get a engine that is on its way out and play will it blend with it

    • The Lightning Hunter

      The Lightning Hunter

      2 ай мурун

      @AgentJayZ So we just need all of your subscribers to pitch in a few bucks and we get to see what FOD damage looks like. I have a high speed camera that I use for lightning research... I'm more than happy to lend it if the money gets raised!

    • chris

      chris

      2 ай мурун

      @AgentJayZ well I guess im buying lotto tickets and if I win your going to run the worlds most powerful blender lol

    • AgentJayZ

      AgentJayZ

      2 ай мурун

      The test cell charges a 20K fee. It takes three techs a day to install the engine and get it ready to run. We would need about a hundred gallons of fuel You supply the engine You put up a bond to cover any damage to the test cell. You need to give me some incentive i.e. why am I doing this? Another day do get it out of the cell. However long it takes to clean up any mess and or damage. So as a rough guess, a half mil oughta cover it. So that's why we don't play around like that.

  100. Mark Richards

    Mark Richards

    2 ай мурун

    Another great video from the boss. Thank you sir, for taking the time to makes these videos. You really help people understand what you’re doing and why you do it. Like the first stage of compression, I’m a big fan.